Reddish Egrets at Sunset Arthur Morris/BIRDS AS ART

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BIRDS AS ART ON-LINE Bulletin #90 October 13, 2002

 

 



 

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Reddish Egrets at Sunset Arthur Morris/BIRDS AS ART

Arthur Morris / Birds as Art
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BIRDS AS ART ON-LINE Bulletin #90 October 13, 2002

 

 



 

[ Birds As Art Home ]
[ About Arthur  ]
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To Order Photographic Accessories:
Call: (863) 692-0906  
Write: Arthur Morris / Birds As Art /
4041 Granada Drive, P.O. BOX 7245,
Indian Lake Estates, FL 33855
Email: birdsasart@verizon.net


 

Copyright 1997-2005 Arthur Morris / BIRDS AS ART

 

Reddish Egrets at Sunset Arthur Morris/BIRDS AS ART

Arthur Morris / Birds as Art
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BIRDS AS ART ON-LINE Bulletin #90 October 13, 2002

 

 



 

[ Birds As Art Home ]
[ About Arthur  ]
[ Photo-Tours | Books | Photo Prints ]
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To Order Photographic Accessories:
Call: (863) 692-0906  
Write: Arthur Morris / Birds As Art /
4041 Granada Drive, P.O. BOX 7245,
Indian Lake Estates, FL 33855
Email: birdsasart@verizon.net


 

Copyright 1997-2005 Arthur Morris / BIRDS AS ART

 

Reddish Egrets at Sunset Arthur Morris/BIRDS AS ART

Arthur Morris / Birds as Art
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BIRDS AS ART ON-LINE Notes October 16, 2002

THE FIRST CRITIQUE

Thanks to Chuck Loftis, who joined us for last year's San Diego IPT, for permitting me to publish the links to his images along with my critique of his work (done last night totally over the internet!)  Chucks comments follow.  

1)  http://www.pbase.com/image/5081845                  pelican in flight
Nice image but nothing to get excited about.  This pelican is in the lower half of the looking-great-pool....  Ratty plumage from molting.   Exposure perfect for undersides.  A bit tight in the frame, from to much cropping?   Bird seems to be angled slightly away from the film plane.  We'd both like to see the whole near wing in the frame.  The one to try for: a killer breeding plumage bird coming in for a landing with feet hanging down...
 

2)  http://www.pbase.com/image/5872045                  black necked stilt
 
Wow,  That's a cool plumage, one that I have never seen before.  The bird is a classic first-winter.  I like the image (cause I ain't seen this plumage before!.  The bird's head is turned away from the film plane (or the CMOS sensor...)  It is often  better to have the bird's head turned 2 or 3 degrees towards the film plane rather than exactly parallel to it.   Why?  That usually ensures a highlight in the eye, perfect lighting on the face (assuming a good sun-angle), and more importantly, it places the bill tip on the exact same plane as the eye which adds tremendously to the apparent sharpness of the image.   I love the reflection, esp. the reflection of the head.  And, I like the wake, and the position of the bird in the frame--a good balance of wake and space.


3)  http://www.pbase.com/image/4594744                  marbled godwit

 
You've made a good image here in a tough situation, shooting from well above the bird.  Biggest nit, bird facing slightly away from the film plans.  I like the OOF grasses in the foreground.  Exposure good. Pointing the camera a bit more to the left would have yielded a slightly better composition with the bird farther back in the frame.  Playing devil's advocate here, if you point the camera left a bit, you loose the nice stuff in the water, i.e., the wake....    Perhaps more forward in the frame would have worked.... with more wake, and, this would eliminate the one tall bit of grass in the lower left.

4)  http://www.pbase.com/image/2587197                  willet
 
Whew, this one has impact!  What a wing.  A bit tight on the wingtip....but Lord, how I love the detail in the wing.  Looks as if you used flash very well here.  For printing, I'd clone out the two little bits of white shell below and behind the bird, and probably the tiny black open mollusk there as well.   Then, I'd add some space behind the bird.  Tim Gray had a piece on how best  to do that in a very recent DDQ.  Forgot to mention, love that sand and the patterns.  Could only be LSB.  Also, I'd clone out the extra pair of legs in the upper left, but all in all, a wonderful image that I would be proud of as is.

5)  http://www.pbase.com/image/3109155                  western gull eat fish (you missed this)
 
JAP.  Just about perfect.  Great exposure and love the way digital reduces contrast.  For printing, I'd crop the reflection of the white belly out from the bottom and crop from behind about 1/3 of the way in from the frame edge to the bird's tail.  This would eliminate the little silver streaks creeping into the frame.  Not quite the impact of the previous image, but very well done.

6)  http://www.pbase.com/image/3109143                  cormorant in early morning
 
Ah, lots to comment on here...  Bird way to centered.  For small-in-the-frame vertical subjects, strive for the rule of thirds or even deeper in the corner.  Perch way to scraggly.  If you are fine with removing all the skinny branches, I'd go for it. Also, must crop out what looks like a bird's head on the bottom frame edge.  Blue-sky silhouette a good try, but no great impact.  Lastly, best to catch the flapping action with the wings both fully extended overhead and to the rear.  Well, a not-to-good one heat leaves me feeling as if I am earning my $$.

7)  http://www.pbase.com/image/3109154                  western gull family
 
Do not like this one either for many reasons.  First off, it seems that you will not crop out the crap digitally--i.e., the white schmutz on the rocks.  Am I correct here?  Do not like:
1-the rather high light angle, not unduly harsh, but high...
2-The right-hand bird's shut eye.
3-The preening bird's shaded head and face, as well as the fact that you cannot see its eye.
4-The bits of white schmutz on the rocks.
 
I do like the juxtaposition of the bird in the back left with the preening bird, though it would have been a stronger image if the back bird had its head turned so that it was looking out of the frame.

8)  http://www.pbase.com/image/3365559                  pelican peekaboo (you were there)
 
f/22 and be there!  Very well done.  I love the way the two breaking waves (or are they rock shadows?) in the distance frame the birds' heads just about perfectly.   A simple crop off the right side would make this a winner by eliminating the little rock on top of the rock on the lower right frame-edge.  Great use of DOF.

9)  http://www.pbase.com/image/3211436                  pelican preening#2
 
Great subject, great light.  Background OK... Could have moved left or right for possibly cleaner or darker background.  Great choice of subject with killer red bill.  Biggest avoidable problem, bird's head and bill angled away from the film plane.  I do remember having said many times, for the best preening images, the bird's head needs to be parallel to the film plane and the eye needs to be visible... (see the Western Gull Family for that one...)

10) http://www.pbase.com/image/3109149                  pelican preening
 
Very nicely done.  I remember that bird, old carpet neck...  This one is just about perfect.   I love the perfect and creative job of framing this one.  Only nit, bird seems to have its eye shut a teench as they often do when preening.  You did, however, follow the preening guidelines set forth above--they really do help you to produce stronger images...

Here is Chuck's critique of my critique:

 

Artie, You get an "A+", 10/10, or maybe better.  Thanks for the expert commentary!
 
I think your IPT promoted me from the class of "cropped tails" and "centered subjects". It also helped me to get the technicals correct (sharpness, exposure, background and foreground considerations, basic composition).  Your post-IPT critique has pointed out more subtle flaws in my images, subtle, because I could not see them. You pointed out some things I just didn't see at all, but they were right there in front of me.  Sometimes, composition is still an issue and I may still need help in the future. I think a remote critique of images made months after an IPT is a terrific idea. It serves as "continuous process of improvement". Funny how we need to be reminded of some standard rules: "head parallel to film plane", etc.. The final phases of this process must deal with "getting the magic and feeling" into the shots. That appears as a large stepping stone off in the horizon. I was in a slump, but now I have some new goals to consider. The critique was worth a lot more than the money spent, and turn around time was fantastic.
 
Best,
 
Chuck,
 
"If you aren't pushing the envelope, you aren't learning anything." - Chuck Loftis

 

 

 

 



 

[ Birds As Art Home ]
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To Order Photographic Accessories:
Call: (863) 692-0906  
Write: Arthur Morris / Birds As Art /
4041 Granada Drive, P.O. BOX 7245,
Indian Lake Estates, FL 33855
Email: birdsasart@verizon.net


 

Copyright 1997-2005 Arthur Morris / BIRDS AS ART